Loving dogs is in your DNA

Being a dog-lover is not a choice, it is in your DNA. 

This finding from a team of researchers in Sweden and England sheds some light on how man's best friend came to be and found being a dog owner is may be genetic.  

A study of twins found that getting a dog is influenced by an individual's genes and may even be inherited, according to Daily Mail. 

It is impossible to say which genes are involved from the study but identical twins agreed far more than non-identical pairs on whether they would have a pet pooch.

Previous research found if we had a pet as a child we are more likely to like animals and own a pet in adulthood.

Bedbugs survived the dinosaur extinction event

A study that began as an investigation into the "utterly bizarre" way in which bedbugs reproduce has revealed they have existed for far longer than humans.

DNA samples from 30 species of bedbug revealed the insects had been around for at least 115 million years, according to BBC.

The blood-sucking parasites predate their earliest known hosts - bats - by more than 50 million years.

Scientists Created Bacteria With a Synthetic Genome. Is This Artificial Life?

In a milestone for synthetic biology, colonies of E. coli thrive with DNA constructed from scratch by humans, not nature.

Scientists have created a living organism whose DNA is entirely human-made perhaps a new form of life, experts said, and a milestone in the field of synthetic biology.

Researchers reported that they had rewritten the DNA of the bacteria Escherichia coli, fashioning a synthetic genome four times larger and far more complex than any previously created.

The bacteria are alive, though unusually shaped and reproducing slowly. But their cells operate according to a new set of biological rules, producing familiar proteins with a reconstructed genetic code.

Flu virus' best friend: Low humidity

Yale researchers have pinpointed a key reason why people are more likely to get sick and even die from flu during winter months: low humidity.

While experts know that cold temperatures and low humidity promote transmission of the flu virus, less is understood about the effect of decreased humidity on the immune system's defenses against flu infection, according to Science Daily.

Butterfly temperature research 'could boost survival chances'

Thousands of wild butterflies have had their temperatures taken by researchers who hope the results could help safeguard the species' future.

A team from the University of Cambridge and a wildlife trust tested 2,000 insects in Bedfordshire, according to BBC.

They are investigating how effectively species can warm or cool themselves, which could help the insects cope with a warming climate.

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