Where body fat is carried can predict cancer risk

Scientists have found that carrying fat around your middle could be as good an indicator of cancer risk as body mass index (BMI), according to research.

It shows that adding about 11cm to the waistline increased the risk of obesity related cancers by 13 per cent.

For bowel cancer, adding around 8 cm to the hips is linked to an increased risk of 15 per cent.

Carrying excess body fat can change the levels of sex hormones, such as oestrogen and testosterone, can cause levels of insulin to rise, and lead to inflammation, all of which are factors that have been associated with increased cancer risk.

Is air pollution keeping us awake?

Everyone occasionally struggles to get a good night’s sleep - perhaps being kept awake worries about work, or simply struggling to ‘switch off, according to Daily Mail.

But not many of us will have put our nocturnal worries down to air pollution.

However, a group of researchers now believe that the level of exposure with receive to harmful particles in the air we breathe may be linked to keeping us awake at night.

A study, measured how long participants spent asleep in bed each night and found that levels of sleep efficiency could be down to the impact of air pollution on the body.

'Fat but fit is a big fat myth'

The idea that people can be fat but medically fit is a myth, say experts. According to BBC

They say people who were obese but who had no initial signs of heart disease, diabetes or high cholesterol were not protected from ill health in later life, contradicting previous research.

The term "fat but fit" refers to the alluring theory that if people are obese but all their other metabolic factors such as blood pressure and blood sugar are within recommended limits then the extra weight will not be harmful.

In this study, researchers analysed data of millions patients between 1995 and 2015 to see if this claim held true.

High Levels of Exercise Linked to Nine Years of Less Aging at the Cellular Level

Despite their best efforts, no scientist has ever come close to stopping humans from aging. Even anti-aging creams can't stop Old Father Time.

But new research reveals you may be able to slow one type of aging -- the kind that happens inside your cells. As long as you're willing to sweat.

"Just because you're 40, doesn't mean you're 40 years old biologically," Tucker said. "We all know people that seem younger than their actual age. The more physically active we are the less biological aging takes place in our bodies."

The study, finds that people who have consistently high levels of physical activity have significantly longer telomeres than those who have sedentary lifestyles, as well as those who are moderately active. According to Science daily.

Widespread vitamin D deficiency likely due to sunscreen use, increase of chronic diseases, review finds

Results from a clinical review find nearly 1 billion people worldwide may have deficient or insufficient levels of vitamin D due to chronic disease and inadequate sun exposure related to sunscreen use. According to Science daily

The study also found that 95 percent of adults may have vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency. Vitamin D variations among races are attributed to differences in skin pigmentation.

"People are spending less time outside and, when they do go out, they're typically wearing sunscreen, which essentially nullifies the body's ability to produce vitamin D," said Kim Pfotenhauer, DO, assistant professor and a researcher on this study. "While we want people to protect themselves against skin cancer, there are healthy, moderate levels of unprotected sun exposure that can be very helpful in boosting vitamin D."