High levels of vitamin D is suspected of increasing mortality rates

The level of vitamin D in our blood should neither be too high nor to low. Scientists from the University of Copenhagen are the first in the world to show that there is a connection between high levels of vitamin D and cardiovascular deaths.

In terms of public health, a lack of vitamin D has long been a focal point. Several studies have shown that too low levels can prove detrimental to our health. However, new research from the University of Copenhagen reveals, for the first time, that also too high levels of vitamin D in our blood is connected to an increased risk of dying from a stroke or a coronary.

Can exercise training prevent premature death in elderly?

Generation 100 will determine whether exercise training leads to more active and healthier years, and will establish reference values for several important measures such as fitness level, daily physical activity, muscle strength, pulmonary function, cognitive function, "mental health," quality of life and balance," says Dr. Dorthe Stensvold, Postdoctor at K. G. Jebsen Center for Exercise in Medicine.

Missing link? African bones predate earliest-known humans by 400,000yrs

A newly discovered fossil has shaken up science’s view of human evolution and could be the missing link between apes and humans: 400,000 years older than the oldest human bone found, the discovery could entirely rewrite our story.

For decades scientists have been stumped on the gap between humans that walked bent over and those that walked upright. Who was the mysterious ancestor that joined the ape-like Australopithecus with the human-like Homo? We could be looking at an answer. It now appears the timeline for earliest upright humans goes back not to 2.3 – but to 2.8 million years.

WHO urges shift to single-use smart syringes

Smart syringes that break after one use should be used for injections by 2020, the World Health Organization has announced.

Reusing syringes leads to more than two million people being infected with diseases including HIV and hepatitis each year.

How much sleep do we really need?

Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine researcher Lydia DonCarlos, PhD, is a member of an expert panel that's making new recommendations on how much sleep people need.

The panel, convened by the National Sleep Foundation, is making its recommendations based on age, ranging from newborns (who need 14 to 17 hours of sleep per day) to adults aged 65 and up (7 to 8 hours per day).

In the new guidelines, there's a wider range of what constitutes a good night's sleep. For example, the expert panel recommends that teens (ages 14 to 17) get 8 to 10 hours of sleep per night. The previous guideline had a narrower recommended range of 8.5 to 9.5 hours per night.

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