Apple apologizes to Chinese consumers

Apple apologised to Chinese consumers after government media attacked its repair policies for two weeks in a campaign that reeked of economic nationalism.

A statement Apple posted in Chinese on its website said the complaints had prompted "deep reflection" and persuaded the company of the need to revamp its repair policies, boost communication with Chinese consumers and strengthen oversight of authorised resellers.

State broadcaster CCTV and the ruling party's flagship newspaper, People's Daily, had led the charge against the American company.

They accused Apple of arrogance, greed and "throwing its weight around" and portrayed it as just the latest Western company to exploit the Chinese consumer.

The attacks quickly backfired, though, and were mocked by the increasingly sophisticated Chinese consumers who revere Apple and its products. State-run media also inadvertently revived complaints over shoddy service by Chinese companies.

Nonetheless, Apple responded with an apology from CEO Tim Cook.

"We've come to understand through this process that because of our poor communication, some have come to feel that Apple's attitude is arrogant and that we don't care about or value feedback from the consumer," his Chinese statement said.

"For the concerns and misunderstandings passed on to the consumer, we express our sincere apologies."

Although Apple enjoys strong support from Chinese consumers, the vehemence of the attacks and the importance of the Chinese market appeared to have persuaded the company to smooth its relations with Chinese consumers and authorities.

The People's Daily newspaper ran an editorial last Wednesday headlined: "Strike down Apple's incomparable arrogance."

It wrote: "Here we have the Western person's sense of superiority making mischief.

"If there's no risk in offending the Chinese consumer, and it also makes for lower overheads, then why not?"

Chinese observers accused People's Daily of gross hypocrisy and pointed out that the newspaper had maintained a stony silence when Chinese companies were implicated over food safety, pollution and other scandals.

Meanwhile, CCTV was shamed when it emerged that celebrities had been recruited to blast the company on Weibo, China's version of Twitter, in what had been billed as a grassroots campaign.

Popular business magazine Caijing said its readers identified a long list of abusers, including state banks that lend to those with political connections while leaving ordinary savers with low rates on deposits.

A government oil company that sets gas prices and other rates as it sees fit, and state telecom providers notorious for their lack of customer service were also criticised.

Source: Associated press

B.N

Google Plans to Shut Down You Tube Till 2023

 

 

Google announced it was planning to shut down YouTube, the world's most popular video-sharing website, till 2023, according to the Voice of Russia.

 In April Fools’ prank video the company declared the site had been in an eight-year contest to find the best video and now the company’s specialists needed a decade to review all the videos and select the winner.

"Tonight at midnight, youtube.com will no longer be accepting entries. After eight amazing years, it is finally time to review everything that has been uploaded to our site and begin the process of selecting a winner," said the video clip.

The winner will get a $500 stipend a clip-on MP3 player and his video will become the sole video to be featured on YouTube when the website re-launches in 2023, the prank video adds.

At the moment the YouTube audience is estimated at 1 billion people.

 Launched in 2005 as a start-up, the You Tube is now described as “one of the most influential forces in today's media landscape.”

In 2006 Google bought You Tube for $1.76 billion, then the web-site’s audience was estimated at 50 million people per month.

H.M

 

 

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