Sea spiders move oxygen with pumping guts (not hearts)

To keep blood and oxygen flowing throughout their bodies, most animals depend on a beating heart. But researchers reporting have discovered that sea spiders use a strange alternative: they move blood and oxygen throughout most of their bodies by pumping their guts.

The sea spiders have an unusual gut in the first place, the researchers say, according to Science Daily.

"Unlike us, with our centrally located guts that are all confined to a single body cavity, the guts of sea spiders branch multiple times and sections of gut tube go down to the end of every leg," says H. Arthur Woods. "In effect, sea spiders guts are 'space-filling' and ubiquitous in their bodies in the same way that our circulatory systems are space-filling and ubiquitous."

Ancient ‘skull cult’ worshipped at world’s oldest temple, says study (PHOTOS)

Strange carvings found on human remains uncovered at Göbekli Tepe in Turkey suggest the ancient people who worshiped there belonged to a ‘skull cult.’
At 11,000 years old, Göbekli Tepe in southeastern Turkey is considered the world’s oldest temple – and just what went on at the site has perplexed researchers for decades.
Now, however, new research published in Science Advances has shown evidence that the neolithic people who built the site venerated the skulls of the dead.

Older male partners 'lower chances of IVF baby success'

The success rate of couples going through IVF is dependent on the age of the man - not only the woman, a US study suggests.

Older men were found to have a lower chance of conceiving than younger men with a female partner of the same age, according to BBC.

Harvard researchers presented their study of nearly 19,000 IVF cycles at the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.

'Brain training' app improves memory in people with cognitive decline

A brain training computer game developed by British neuroscientists has been shown to improve the memory of patients in the very earliest stages of dementia and could help such patients avert some symptoms of cognitive decline.

Researchers who developed the "game show"-like app and tested its effects on cognition and motivation in a small trial found that patients who played the game over a period of a month had around a 40 percent improvement in their memory scores, according to Reuters.

Ancient whale yields secrets to filter feeding's origins

The blue whale is the largest animal that has ever lived. And yet they feed almost exclusively on tiny crustaceans known as krill. The secret is in the baleen, a complex filter-feeding system that allows the enormous whales to strain huge volumes of saltwater, leaving only krill and other small organisms behind. Now, researchers who have described an extinct relative of baleen whales offer new insight into how baleen first evolved. According to Science daily

The findings shed light on a long-standing debate about whether the first baleen whales were toothless suction feeders or toothed whales that used their teeth like a sieve to filter prey out of water, the researchers say. The teeth of the newly discovered species of mysticete, called Coronodon havensteini, lend support to the latter view.

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