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Flu virus' best friend: Low humidity

Yale researchers have pinpointed a key reason why people are more likely to get sick and even die from flu during winter months: low humidity.

While experts know that cold temperatures and low humidity promote transmission of the flu virus, less is understood about the effect of decreased humidity on the immune system's defenses against flu infection, according to Science Daily.

Butterfly temperature research 'could boost survival chances'

Thousands of wild butterflies have had their temperatures taken by researchers who hope the results could help safeguard the species' future.

A team from the University of Cambridge and a wildlife trust tested 2,000 insects in Bedfordshire, according to BBC.

They are investigating how effectively species can warm or cool themselves, which could help the insects cope with a warming climate.

A Violent Splash of Magma That May Have Made the Moon

The moon is far more than a largely dead orb. Our planet’s pale satellite is the creator of tides, the catcher of meteors and the only other world in the starry ocean where humanity has set foot. But scientists are still not entirely clear how it was made. Solving this mystery would not only reveal the moon’s origins, it would also help explain our own planet’s evolution.

A study suggests that the moon was forged from the fires of an ocean of magma sloshing over baby Earth’s surface. If correct, this model may solve a longstanding paradox.

Blue supergiant stars open doors to concert in space

Blue supergiants are rock-and-roll: they live fast and die young. This makes them rare and difficult to study. Before space telescopes were invented, few blue supergiants had been observed, so our knowledge of these stars was limited. Using recent NASA space telescope data, an international team led by KU Leuven studied the sounds originating inside these stars and discovered that almost all blue supergiants shimmer in brightness because of waves on their surface according to Science Daily.

Since the dawn of humanity, the stars in the night sky have captured our imagination. We even sing nursery rhymes to children pondering the nature of stars: "Twinkle, twinkle little star, how I wonder what you are". Telescopes are able to probe far into the universe, but astronomers have struggled to 'see' inside the stars. New space telescopes allow astronomers to 'see' the waves that originate in the deep interior of the stars. This makes it possible to study these stars using asteroseismology, a similar technique to how seismologists use earthquakes to study the Earth's interior.

Climate change: How frogs could vanish from ponds

Climate change is having an impact on frogs found in British ponds, research suggests.

A deadly frog disease is spreading due to warmer temperatures and in the next 50 years could cause entire populations to vanish, according to a study.

The virus could spell disaster for the common frog, which is a familiar sight in garden ponds and the countryside, according to BBC.

Amphibians have been particularly hard hit by changes in the natural world.

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