New insight into Earth's crust, mantle and outer core interactions

A new study, sheds light on a longstanding question that has puzzled earth scientists.

Using previously unavailable data, researchers confirm a correlation between the movement of plate tectonics on the Earth's surface, the flow of mantle above the Earth's core and the rate of reversal of the Earth's magnetic field which has long been hypothesized, according to Science Daily.

They suggest that it takes around 120-130 million years for slabs of ancient ocean floor to sink (subduct) from the Earth's surface to a sufficient depth in the mantle where they can cool the core, which in turn causes the liquid iron in the Earth's outer core to flow more vigorously and produce more reversals of the Earth's magnetic field.

This study is the first to demonstrate this correlation using records and proxies of global rates of subduction from various sources including a continuous global plate reconstruction model developed at the University of Sydney. These records were compared with a new compilation of magnetic field reversals whose occurrence is locked into volcanic and sedimentary rocks.

What REALLY happens when a black hole eats a star: Astronomers find they gorge and become 'overfed' causing massive radiation emissions

It is one of the most violent events in the universe.

Unsuspecting stars that wanders too close to the supermassive black hole in the center of their galaxy are torn apart by the black hole's gravity, according to Daily Mail.

Now researchers have shed new light on the violent cataclysm called a tidal disruption event (TDE).  

The new unified model from the University of Copenhagen's Niels Bohr Institute and UC Santa Cruz also helps explain recent observations of these extreme events.

First 3D-printed human corneas

The first human corneas have been 3D printed by scientists at Newcastle University, UK , according to Science Daily.

It means the technique could be used in the future to ensure an unlimited supply of corneas.

As the outermost layer of the human eye, the cornea has an important role in focusing vision.

Yet there is a significant shortage of corneas available to transplant, with 10 million people worldwide requiring surgery to prevent corneal blindness as a result of diseases such as trachoma, an infectious eye disorder.

In addition, almost 5 million people suffer total blindness due to corneal scarring caused by burns, lacerations, abrasion or disease.

Mice regrow brain tissue after stroke with bioengineered gel

In a first-of-its-kind finding, a new stroke-healing gel helped regrow neurons and blood vessels in mice with stroke-damaged brains, according to Science Daily.

"We tested this in laboratory mice to determine if it would repair the brain in a model of stroke, and lead to recovery," said Dr. S. Thomas Carmichael, Professor and Chair of neurology at UCLA. "This study indicated that new brain tissue can be regenerated in what was previously just an inactive brain scar after stroke."

The results suggest that such an approach may someday be a new therapy for stroke in people, said Dr. Tatiana Segura, a former Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at UCLA who is now a professor at Duke University.

Mars rocks may harbor signs of life from 4 billion years ago

Iron-rich rocks near ancient lake sites on Mars could hold vital clues that show life once existed there, research suggests.

These rocks -- which formed in lake beds -- are the best place to seek fossil evidence of life from billions of years ago, researchers say ,according to Science Daily.

A new study that sheds light on where fossils might be preserved could aid the search for traces of tiny creatures -- known as microbes -- on Mars, which it is thought may have supported primitive life forms around four billion years ago.

A team of scientists has determined that sedimentary rocks made of compacted mud or clay are the most likely to contain fossils. These rocks are rich in iron and a mineral called silica, which helps preserve fossils.

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