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Ultra-small nanoprobes could be a leap forward in high-resolution human-machine interfaces

Machine enhanced humans -- or cyborgs as they are known in science fiction -- could be one step closer to becoming a reality, thanks to new research Lieber Group at Harvard University, as well as scientists from University of Surrey and Yonsei University.

Researchers have conquered the monumental task of manufacturing scalable nanoprobe arrays small enough to record the inner workings of human cardiac cells and primary neurons.

The ability to read electrical activities from cells is the foundation of many biomedical procedures, such as brain activity mapping and neural prosthetics. Developing new tools for intracellular electrophysiology (the electric current running within cells) that push the limits of what is physically possible (spatiotemporal resolution) while reducing invasiveness could provide a deeper understanding of electrogenic cells and their networks in tissues, as well as new directions for human-machine interfaces, according to Science Daily.

Climate change: Water and green energy produced by a single device

Researchers have found a way to purify water and produce electricity from a single device powered by sunlight.

The scientists adapted a solar panel that not only generated power, but used some of the heat energy to distil and purify sea water, according to BBC.

They believe the idea could make a major difference in sunny climates with limited water supplies.

The lead author expects that a commercial device could be available in five years.

New Weapons Against Cancer: Millions of Bacteria Programmed to Kill

Genetically modified microbes release “nanobodies” that alert the immune system to cancer in mice, scientists report.

Scientists have used genetically reprogrammed bacteria to destroy tumors in mice. The innovative method one day may lead to cancer therapies that treat the disease more precisely, without the side effects of conventional drugs.

The researchers already are scrambling to develop a commercial treatment, but success in mice does not guarantee that this strategy will work in people.

“At some point in the future, we will use programmable bacteria for treatment,” said Doctors “we think there’s just too much potential.”

Cancer diagnosis: The need to boost the Raman technique

Researchers unite efforts to boost the application of the Raman technique in the Clinic

Although it is very advantageous for the early diagnosis of multiple pathologies, including cancer, perhaps because of ignorance, the Raman spectroscopy technique is still very little applied in the clinic. In Europe, only a few hospitals in the Netherlands, Germany and the UK use it.

Raman spectroscopy

Raman spectroscopy, identified with the name of the scientist who discovered it, the Indian Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman, Nobel Prize for Physics in 1930, is a high-resolution optical technique that through the incidence of radiation (light) on any sample can obtain information in seconds. That is, it provides information about the compounds present in the analyzed sample.

Physicists stuffed a ghostly 'skyrmion' full of 'antiskyrmions'

There are ghostly shapes hidden in magnetic fields.

They're not made of stuff in the way a lightning bolt or a beam of light is. A lighting bolt carries a fairly defined group of electrons from the sky all the way to the ground. Sunshine that hits your face consists mostly of the same photons that traveled millions of miles from the sun.

But magnetic fields contain things called skyrmions that are different from electrons and photons; a skyrmion is a knot of magnetic field lines looping around each other. As it drifts from one spot to the next,

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