To predict the future, the brain uses two clocks

That moment when you step on the gas pedal a split second before the light changes, or when you tap your toes even before the first piano note of Camila Cabello's "Havana" is struck. That's anticipatory timing.

One type relies on memories from past experiences. The other on rhythm. Both are critical to our ability to navigate and enjoy the world, according to Science Daily.

New University of California, Berkeley, research shows the neural networks supporting each of these timekeepers are split between two different parts of the brain, depending on the task at hand.

Virtual reality simulation of a supermassive black hole

The black hole at the centre of our galaxy, Sagittarius A*, has been visualised in virtual reality for the first time.

Scientists at Radboud University, The Netherlands and Goethe University, Germany used recent astrophysical models of Sagittarius A* to create a series of images that were then put together to create a 360 degree virtual reality simulation of the black hole, that can be viewed on widely available VR consoles. The authors suggest that this virtual reality simulation could be useful for studying black holes, according to Science Daily.

Scientists develop a genetically modified virus that kills cancer cells

Scientists at Oxford University  have developed a genetically modified virus that can kill cancer cells, according to Daily Mail.

The virus attacks both tumours and healthy cells, known as fibroblasts, that have been 'tricked' into protecting the cancer from the immune system.   

Any existing treatment that kills 'tricked' fibroblasts, may also destroy those in the bone marrow and skin.

Researchers said it is the first time cancer-associated fibroblasts within solid tumours have been specifically targeted in this way.

Dr Kerry Fisher, who led the research, said: 'Even when most of the cancer cells in a carcinoma are killed, fibroblasts can protect the residual cancer cells and help them to recover and flourish.

Unique type of skeletal stem cells found in 'resting zone' are actually hard at work

Skeletal stem cells are valuable because it's thought they can heal many types of bone injury, but they're difficult to find because researchers don't know exactly what they look like or where they live, according to Science Daily.

Researchers at the University of Michigan have identified a type of skeletal stem cell in the "resting zone" of the epiphyseal growth plate, which is a special cartilaginous tissue and an important driver for bone growth.

Noriaki Ono, U-M assistant professor of dentistry, said that locating skeletal stem cells in the resting zone makes sense because it's widely believed that stem cells stay quiet until they're needed.

New human cell structure discovered

A new structure in human cells has been discovered by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. The structure is a new type of protein complex that the cell uses to attach to its surroundings and proves to play a key part in cell division, according to Science Daily.

The cells in a tissue are surrounded by a net-like structure called the extracellular matrix. To attach itself to the matrix the cells have receptor molecules on their surfaces, which control the assembly of large protein complexes inside them.

These so-called adhesion complexes connect the outside to the cell interior and also signal to the cell about its immediate environment, which affects its properties and behaviour.

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