Cold, dry planets could have a lot of hurricanes

Nearly every atmospheric science textbook ever written will say that hurricanes are an inherently wet phenomenon -- they use warm, moist air for fuel. But according to new simulations, the storms can also form in very cold, dry climates, according to Science Daily.

A climate as cold and dry as the one in the study is unlikely to ever become the norm on Earth, especially as climate change is making the world warmer and wetter. But the findings could have implications for storms on other planets and for the intrinsic properties of hurricanes that most scientists and educators currently believe to be true.

"We have theories for how hurricanes work at temperatures that we're used to experiencing on Earth, and theoretically, they should still apply if we move to a colder and drier climate," said Dan Chavas, an assistant professor of earth, atmospheric and planetary sciences at Purdue University. "We wanted to know if hurricanes really need water. And we've shown that they don't -- but in a very different world."

A Menu for Mars? NASA Plans to Grow Chiles in Space

As the race to the red planet heats up  NASA hopes to send humans to Mars by the 2030s, and a private rocket venture, SpaceX, is aiming for sooner scientists are working on building a garden in space. The goal is to grow fresh produce to supplement existing packaged foods.

NASA has already harvested a variety of edible leafy greens, grown without earthly gravity or natural light. Soon, researchers plan to expand to a more difficult crop, in their quest to answer one of the most pressing questions of a Mars mission: How will astronauts get enough nutritious food to survive years in the unforgiving depths of space?

Iceland pilot whales: Dozens of dead mammals found beached

Dozens of dead beached whales have been spotted by sightseers during a helicopter flight over western Iceland.
The dead pilot whales were photographed during the trip on Thursday over a beach at Longufjorur.
It's unclear how the mammals became beached. The region where they were spotted is secluded, inaccessible by car and has very few visitors.
Police in the nearby town of Stykkisholmur have been made aware of the discovery, local media say, according to BBC.
The images were taken by helicopter pilot David Schwarzhans.

Scientists Took an M.R.I. Scan of an Atom

The hospital technology, typically used to identify human ailments, captured perhaps the world’s smallest magnetic resonance image.

As our devices get smaller and more sophisticated, so do the materials we use to make them. That means we have to get up close to engineer new materials. Really close.

Different microscopy techniques allow scientists to see the nucleotide-by-nucleotide genetic sequences in cells down to the resolution of a couple atoms as seen in an atomic force microscopy image. But scientists have taken imaging a step further, developing a new magnetic resonance imaging technique that provides unprecedented detail, right down to the individual atoms of a sample.

Ultra-small nanoprobes could be a leap forward in high-resolution human-machine interfaces

Machine enhanced humans -- or cyborgs as they are known in science fiction -- could be one step closer to becoming a reality, thanks to new research Lieber Group at Harvard University, as well as scientists from University of Surrey and Yonsei University.

Researchers have conquered the monumental task of manufacturing scalable nanoprobe arrays small enough to record the inner workings of human cardiac cells and primary neurons.

The ability to read electrical activities from cells is the foundation of many biomedical procedures, such as brain activity mapping and neural prosthetics. Developing new tools for intracellular electrophysiology (the electric current running within cells) that push the limits of what is physically possible (spatiotemporal resolution) while reducing invasiveness could provide a deeper understanding of electrogenic cells and their networks in tissues, as well as new directions for human-machine interfaces, according to Science Daily.

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