Saudi Warplanes Hit Yemen's Faj Attan With Banned Weapons

The Saudi warplanes pounded Faj Attan in the countryside of Sana'a with banned bombs a few hours ago, FNA reported.

According to local sources, the Saudi warplanes used prohibited bombs and missiles in their today airstrikes on Faj Attan area in Southern Sana'a.

There has yet been no report on the exact number of the casualties.

Saudi Arabia has been striking Yemen for 44 days now to restore power to fugitive president Mansour Hadi, a close ally of Riyadh. The Saudi-led aggression has so far killed at least 3,585 Yemenis, including hundreds of women and children.

Hadi stepped down in January and refused to reconsider the decision despite calls by Ansarullah revolutionaries of the Houthi movement.

Despite Riyadh's claims that it is bombing the positions of the Ansarullah fighters, Saudi warplanes are flattening residential areas and civilian infrastructures.

On April 21, Saudi Arabia declared end to Yemen airstrikes after weeks of bombings, but airstrikes are still underway.

Over 20 Int'l Aid Organizations warn against deteriorating situation in Yemen

Meanwhile, several international relief and aid organizations warned that they will suspend their humanitarian aids and services to Yemen if Saudi Arabia continues to block dispatch of fuel supplies into Yemen.

A sum of 22 human rights organizations in a joint statement said that they will temporarily halt dispatch of their immediate help to Yemen if the land, sea and air routes for dispatch of fuel to Yemen are not reopened.

Relief and aid coordinator of Oxfam in Yemen said that all routes for the dispatch of basic aids such as foodstuff, fuel and medical equipment for millions of Yemenis should be reopened.

The representatives of international aid organizations reiterated that the fuel shortage in Yemen has reached a critical stage.

 

Last month, the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) warned that the food reserves in Yemen are coming to an end as millions of Yemenis are facing malnutrition.

FAO reported that amidst escalating conflict and at a crucial time in the country’s cropping season, almost 11 million people in Yemen are severely food insecure and millions more are at the risk of not meeting their basic food needs.

“Even before the fighting intensified this spring, Yemenis were in dire need of support to build up their agricultural production,” said Abdessalam Ould Ahmed, FAO Assistant Director-General for North Africa and the Near East.

He noted that 10.6 million Yemenis are now severely food insecure, of which 4.8 million are facing "emergency" conditions, suffering from a severe lack of food access, very high and increasing malnutrition, and irreversible destruction of livelihoods.

"The deteriorating situation means we need to double down on our efforts to ensure that as many farmers as possible are able to plant this growing season and strengthen their ability to withstand future shocks,” Ould Ahmed added.

More than half of Yemen’s population - some 16 million out of a total of 26 million - is in need of some form of humanitarian aid and has no access to safe water.

The latest escalation of conflicts is expected to further increase food insecurity in the poverty-stricken country. Paradoxically, some 2.5 million food producers, including farmers, pastoralists, fishermen and agricultural wage laborers, are among those identified as food insecure.

We are entering a crucial period for crop production in Yemen and now, more than ever, agriculture cannot be an afterthought if we want to prevent more people from becoming food insecure amidst this crisis,” said FAO Representative for Yemen, Salah Hajj Hassan.

R.S

 

 

 

Share