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How to make Damascene Zhurat

Zhurat is a traditional Syrian herbal drink. It is a drink made from a blend of wild flowers, herbs, leaves, fruits and Damascene rose petals

Zhurat helps the body's immune system fight off viruses and dangerous infections-causing bacteria. It may improve metabolism and weight loss when consumed regularly; it soothes gas, cramps, and bloating as well as being a cure-all for stomach upsets.

Egg Omelette

The omelette originated from ancient Persia.

According to the legend, ancient people used to cook this delicious dish (omelette) annually in Easter. One of famous incidents involving the omelette that when Napoleon Bonaparte and his army were traveling through southern France, they decided to rest for the night near the town of Bessières. He then ordered the people of this town to gather all the eggs in the village and to prepare a huge omelette for his army.

This traditional Syrian recipe of omelette is from a little restaurant called Malik Al Ijja, the King of Omelettes, located in a back alley in Aleppo’s Old City.

Harissa or Basboosa

This is one of the most popular dessert recipes throughout the Levant and Egypt. You can actually find harissa in most bakeries right next to the bread and fatayer. It is that popular!

Harissa is a semolina based dessert, every country makes it slightly different. For example, In Syria and Palestine they make the recipe with yogurt and coconut while in Egypt it’s called basboosa and only water is used. Some other places around the Mid-East also add eggs to make it more of a cake rather than bars.

Kamruddin Drink

Kamruddin or A'amruddin as we pronounce it in Syria is an apricot juice or sun dried apricot paste made by squeezing hundreds of kilograms of apricot, mixing it with glucose syrup and spreading on giant trays to dry under the summer sun. The final product is a tangy apricot leather-like orange sheet. It was first produced in the Ghouta and Syria produces tonnes of Kamruddin every year with 90% of the production exported to other Arabic countries. All of it to be consumed over the month of Ramadan.

 

Ingredients: 

Kamruddin paste 300g

Water 500 mls

Sugar 2 tbs

Orange Blossom water 1tbs

Marmalade of Oranges

According to food historian Ivan Day, Marmaladeof Oranges is one of the earliest known recipes which comes from the recipe book of Eliza Cholmondeley around 1677.

Marmalade is considered a top choice on the Syria breakfast table, because it has a zesty flavor, and it is good for warm spring days! You can have it at breakfast, spread it on biscuits or use it as a topping on Lemon Bread.

The name Marmalade comes from the Portuguese word Marmelos, a quince paste similar in texture to an orange spread popular long before the commercialization of marmalade in the late 18th century.