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Signs of faster aging process identified through gene research

New research has shed light on the molecular changes that occur in our bodies as we age.

In the largest study of its kind, researchers, examined expression of genes in blood samples from 15,000 people across the world.

They found 1,450 genes that are linked to aging, and also uncovered a link between these genes and factors such as diet, smoking and exercise.

Needle-phobic pancreas transplant 'world first'

A British woman has become the first person in the world to have a pancreas transplant because of a severe needle phobia, her doctors have said.

Sue York - who has had type-1 diabetes since she was seven - would shake uncontrollably and vomit when injecting herself with insulin.

Ms York told the BBC's Victoria Derbyshire programme the operation had "completely altered my life".

Low vitamin B12 levels may lead to brain shrinkage, cognitive problems

Older people with low blood levels of vitamin B12 markers may be more likely to have lower brain volumes and have problems with their thinking skills.

Foods that come from animals, including fish, meat, especially liver, milk, eggs and poultry are usual sources of vitamin B12.

Fiber intake associated with reduced risk of death

Dietary fiber may be associated with a reduced risk of death from cardiovascular, infectious and respiratory diseases, as well as a reduced risk of death from any cause over a nine-year period, according to a report.

Fiber, the edible part of plants that resist digestion, has been hypothesized to lower risks of heart disease, some cancers, diabetes and obesity. It is known to assist with bowel movements, reduce blood cholesterol levels, improve blood glucose levels, lower blood pressure, promote weight loss and reduce inflammation and bind to potential cancer-causing agents to increase the likelihood they will be excreted by the body.

Pharma 'cash call' for new antibiotics

More than 80 pharmaceutical companies have called on governments to develop new ways of paying them to develop antibiotics.

In a joint declaration, at the World Economic Forum, they said the value of antibiotics "does not reflect the benefits they bring to society".

In return, they have promised to invest in research and improve access to antibiotics around the world, according to BBC.

Signatories include GSK, Merck, Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson.