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Little to no association between butter consumption, chronic disease or total mortality

Butter consumption was only weakly associated with total mortality, not associated with cardiovascular disease, and slightly inversely associated (protective) with diabetes, according to a new epidemiological study which analyzed the association of butter consumption with chronic disease and all-cause mortality. This systematic review and meta-analysis, was led by Tufts scientists including Laura Pimpin, Ph.D

Based on a systematic review and search of multiple online academic and medical databases, the researchers identified nine eligible research studies including 636,151 individuals .

Butter consumption was standardized across all nine studies to 14 grams/day, estimated serving of butter (or roughly one tablespoon). Overall, the average butter consumption across the nine studies ranged from roughly one-third of a serving per day to 3.2 servings per day. The study found mostly small or insignificant associations of each daily serving of butter with total mortality, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes.

Zinc in the body may contribute to kidney stones

New research on kidney stone formation reveals that zinc levels may contribute to kidney stone formation, a common urinary condition that can cause excruciating pain. The research found that zinc may be the core by which stone formation starts.

The study, opens a new perspective into the cause of urinary stones and related diseases and might ultimately lead to the identification of new preventive and therapeutic approaches.

"The ultimate goal of our research team is to prevent kidney stones from happening in the first place and to understand the mechanisms by which they form a part of that effort," said lead author Thomas Chi, MD, an assistant professor of medicine. Chi has worked extensively on developing a fruit fly model of kidney stones.

'Bath daily' advice for eczema children

If your child has eczema it is fine to give them a dunk in the bath every day, as long as you apply lots of moisturising emollient cream to their skin afterwards, say US researchers.

Some experts have said infrequent washing might be better because too much washing can dry out the skin, according to BBC.

To try to settle the debate, the US team looked at the available medical evidence.

They say while it's best to avoid too much soap, a daily soak is fine.

UK experts agree, although they point out that there hasn't been a great deal of research in this area and more studies would be helpful.

Benefits of drinking coffee outweigh risks, review suggests

Coffee is enjoyed by millions of people every day and the 'coffee experience' has become a staple of our modern life and culture. While the current body of research related to the effects of coffee consumption on human health has been contradictory, a study, found that the potential benefits of moderate coffee drinking outweigh the risks in adult consumers for the majority of major health outcomes considered.

Researchers systematically reviewed 1,277 studies from 1970 to-date on coffee's effect on human health and found the general scientific consensus is that regular, moderate coffee drinking (defined as 3-4 cups per day) essentially has a neutral effect on health, or can be mildly beneficial.

Higher daily dose of aspirin could play key role in preventing heart attacks for those with diabetes

In some cases, an apple a day may keep the doctor away, but for people with diabetes, regular, over-the-counter Aspirin may also do the job.

A new study researcher Scot Simpson has shed light on the use of Aspirin as a preventative measure for cardiovascular disease and reoccurrence in patients with diabetes.

The study collected data from clinical trials that looked at whether taking Aspirin as a course of treatment would prevent a first or recurrent heart attack or stroke.