High-cholesterol diet, eating eggs do not increase risk of heart attack

In the majority of population, dietary cholesterol affects serum cholesterol levels only a little, and few studies have linked the intake of dietary cholesterol to an elevated risk of cardiovascular diseases. Globally, many nutrition recommendations no longer set limitations to the intake of dietary cholesterol. However, in carriers of the apolipoprotein E type 4 allele -- which significantly impacts cholesterol metabolism -- the effect of dietary cholesterol on serum cholesterol levels is greater . Research data on the association between a high intake of dietary cholesterol and the risk of cardiovascular diseases in this population group hasn't been available until now.

Half the world to be short-sighted by 2050

Half the world's population (nearly 5 billion) will be short-sighted (myopic) by 2050, with up to one-fifth of them (1 billion) at a significantly increased risk of blindness if current trends continue, says a study.

The number with vision loss from high myopia is expected to increase seven-fold from 2000 to 2050, with myopia to become a leading cause of permanent blindness worldwide.

The rapid increase in the prevalence of myopia globally is attributed to, "environmental factors (nurture), principally lifestyle changes resulting from a combination of decreased time outdoors and increased near work activities, among other factors," say the authors.

Why eating greens is good for your gut

Eat your greens and you will grow up to be big and strong, parents are fond of telling their children.

Scientists believe they have found an extra reason why sprouts and broccoli are so good for us.

A sugar molecule found in cabbage, spinach and other leafy greens has been discovered that helps the good bacteria in our stomachs flourish.

And when good bacteria are plentiful in our stomach, it leaves little room for ‘bad’ bacteria to grow.

How eating avocado could save your life

They are a great addition to a salad or smoothie.

But for many, the avocado has come to be seen as a guilty pleasure.

Though classed as a fruit, it is not typical in the fact that rather than being high in carbohydrate, avocados are high in fat.

Fat has long been hailed the dietary enemy number one, but as the tables turn and the scientific spotlight shines more acutely on sugar, so the benefits of the humble avocado are being realised.

A new study has revealed adding the green fruit to your diet can aid weight loss.  

Furthermore, the fruit reduces a person’s risk of heart disease, according to scientists.

Excitement at new cancer treatment

A therapy that retrains the body's immune system to fight cancer has provoked excitement after more than 90% of terminally ill patients reportedly went into remission.

White blood cells were taken from patients with leukaemia, modified in the lab and then put back, according to BBC.

But the data has not been published or reviewed and two patients are said to have died from an extreme immune response.