Critical Vitamins for Every Woman

If you’ve ever stood paralyzed in the vitamin aisle, facing the alphabet soup of supplements, fear no more. This is Dr. Oz’s list of critical vitamins that every woman should be taking; this list should be easy to remember! 

3 Ways Vitamin C Can Help You Look Younger

As we age, we lose the natural vitamin C in our skin. Luckily, lemons contain the vitamin C we need to look and feel fresh again.

Unlocking the vitamin C in lemons can help turn back the clock in three ways:

1. Age Spots
The best way to use vitamin C on your age spots is lemon juice. The citric acid in lemon juice can help gradually fade the spots and help even your skin tone.

It's simple: Dab lemon juice onto your age spots daily. Let it sit for 5 to 10 minutes and say good-bye to unwanted spots.

Dry Eye

A diagnosis of dry eyes means that your eyes are no longer able to produce enough tears to stay moisturized or are producing poor quality tears. Almost everyone suffers from dry eyes at one point or another, but frequent instances of dry eye can be a sign of a more permanent condition called dry eye syndrome. According to the American Association of Ophthalmology, approximately 3.2 million women and 1.7 million men over the age of 50 suffer from chronic dry eyes. There are many symptoms and causes of dry eye. The good news is that there are also many ways to treat it.

Depression linked to higher heart disease death risk in younger women

55 and younger are twice as likely to suffer a heart attack, die or require artery-opening procedures if they're moderately or severely depressed, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

MRI brain scans detect people with early Parkinson's

Oxford University researchers funded by Parkinson's UK have developed a simple and quick MRI technique that offers promise for early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease.

The team demonstrated that their new MRI approach can detect people who have early-stage Parkinson's disease with 85% accuracy, according to research published in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

'At the moment we have no way to predict who is at risk of Parkinson's disease in the vast majority of cases,' says Dr Clare Mackay of the Department of Psychiatry at Oxford University, one of the joint lead researchers. 'We are excited that this MRI technique might prove to be a good marker for the earliest signs of Parkinson's. The results are very promising.'