Benefits of drinking coffee outweigh risks, review suggests

Coffee is enjoyed by millions of people every day and the 'coffee experience' has become a staple of our modern life and culture. While the current body of research related to the effects of coffee consumption on human health has been contradictory, a study, found that the potential benefits of moderate coffee drinking outweigh the risks in adult consumers for the majority of major health outcomes considered.

Researchers systematically reviewed 1,277 studies from 1970 to-date on coffee's effect on human health and found the general scientific consensus is that regular, moderate coffee drinking (defined as 3-4 cups per day) essentially has a neutral effect on health, or can be mildly beneficial.

Higher daily dose of aspirin could play key role in preventing heart attacks for those with diabetes

In some cases, an apple a day may keep the doctor away, but for people with diabetes, regular, over-the-counter Aspirin may also do the job.

A new study researcher Scot Simpson has shed light on the use of Aspirin as a preventative measure for cardiovascular disease and reoccurrence in patients with diabetes.

The study collected data from clinical trials that looked at whether taking Aspirin as a course of treatment would prevent a first or recurrent heart attack or stroke.

More reasons to eat your broccoli

Love it or hate it, broccoli is touted as a superfood, offering an array of health benefits. And it's about to get even more super.

Researchers have identified candidate genes controlling the accumulation of phenolic compounds in broccoli. Consumption of phenolic compounds, including certain flavonoids, is associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease, type II diabetes, asthma, and several types of cancer.

"Phenolic compounds have good antioxidant activity, and there is increasing evidence that this antioxidant activity affects biochemical pathways affiliated with inflammation in mammals. We need inflammation because it's a response to disease or damage, but it's also associated with initiation of a number of degenerative diseases.

Bubbly drink trial 'to boost cancer therapy'

Scientists are investigating whether bubbly drinks could boost the success of cancer treatments, after winning a Cancer Research UK award for ideas "outside the box".

Researchers from Oxford and Ulster universities say low oxygen levels in tumours is a key reason why radiotherapy and drugs fail, according to BBC.

They hope to develop a drink, rich in oxygen micro-bubbles, that could deliver oxygen to cancerous masses.

But they say their work is just beginning.

Scientists have noted for years that many cancerous tissues have less oxygen than their healthy counterparts.

Eating nuts slashes prostate cancer death risk by a third

Men with prostate cancer could slash their risk of death by more than a third by eating nuts regularly, a major study shows.

Five 1oz servings a week of any type of nut cut mortality rates by 34 per cent, researchers found.

But there was no evidence that eating nuts reduces the risk of developing the disease in the first place.

The results come from the largest ever study into the effects of a nut-rich diet on prostate cancer.

Previous studies have hinted a healthy diet and lifestyle, including frequent snacking on nuts, can have a protective effect. In 2014, scientists found walnuts in particular seemed to significantly lower the risk of a tumour.

In the latest study, tracked 47,000 men over 26 years. They identified 6,800 who developed prostate cancer.