Heart attack care dangerously unequal for women

Fewer women who suffer a heart attack would die if they were given the same treatments as men, a new study found.

Researchers analysed the outcomes of 180,368 Swedish patients who suffered a heart attack over a 10-year period, according to BBC.

They found women were three times more likely to die from their heart attack than men in the year after having one.

The British Heart Foundation said: "Heart attacks are often seen as a male health issue, but more women die from heart disease than breast cancer."

Could sugar be responsible for the obesity and diabetes epidemics?

The idea that sugar could be a fundamental cause of the global obesity and diabetes epidemics, with deleterious effects on the human body that go beyond just empty calories, should be considered seriously again, according to Science Daily.

In the midst of such a huge public health crisis, Taubes says "we must do more to discourage consumption while we improve our understanding of sugar's role.

Doctors have long suspected sugar is not simply a source of excess calories but a fundamental cause of obesity and type 2 diabetes, writes Taubes. But until recently, fat consumption and total energy balance have dominated the debate about obesity and the nature of a healthy diet.

Gaming addiction classified as disorder by WHO

Gaming addiction is to be listed as a mental health condition for the first time by the World Health Organisation.

Its 11th International Classification of Diseases (ICD) will include the condition "gaming disorder". according to BBC.

The draft document describes it as a pattern of persistent or recurrent gaming behaviour so severe that it takes "precedence over other life interests".

Some countries had already identified it as a major public health issue.

Limit children's snacks to 100 calories, health body says

Half of the sugar young children in England consume comes from unhealthy snacks and sweet drinks, figures show.

On average, primary school children have at least three sugary snacks a day, Public Health England found, according to BBC.

This means they can easily consume three times more sugar than the recommended maximum.

PHE has now launched a campaign to encourage parents to look for healthier snacks of no more than 100 calories - and to limit them to two a day.

Try exercise to improve memory and thinking, new guideline urges

For patients with mild cognitive impairment, don't be surprised if your health care provider prescribes exercise rather than medication. A new guideline for medical practitioners says they should recommend twice-weekly exercise to people with mild cognitive impairment to improve memory and thinking, according to Science Daily.

"Regular physical exercise has long been shown to have heart health benefits, and now we can say exercise also may help improve memory for people with mild cognitive impairment," says Ronald Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., lead author. "What's good for your heart can be good for your brain." Dr. Petersen is the Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer's Disease Research.