Children 'exercise less as they get older'

The number of children doing an hour of exercise a day falls by nearly 40% between the ages of five and 12.

Figures suggest that by the final year of primary school, just 17% of pupils are doing the recommended 60 minutes of physical activity every day, according to BBC.

A spokesman for Public Health England described the drop in activity levels as "concerning".

More than a third of children in England are overweight by the time they leave primary school.

Cranberries are superfoods

 Cranberries have long been hailed a 'superfood' for their cancer-fighting properties but now they have been proven to benefit our gut health, say experts.

For the first time, certain friendly microbes have been found to grow when fed a carbohydrate in the fruit. 

Good intestinal bacteria not only improves digestion but also our brain health, mood, emotions, energy levels, and weight loss, according to Daily Mail.

Whats more, our microflora has also increasingly been linked to many aspects of health, including aging, arthritis, depression, cancer and heart conditions.  

Orange a day cuts the risk of dementia

Eating an orange a day could slash the risk of dementia, a major study shows.

Daily intake of any citrus fruits such as oranges, grapefruits, lemons or limes can cut the chances of developing the incurable brain condition by almost a quarter, it suggests.

The findings, by a team of scientists, suggest that tangy fruits could be a powerful weapon against a disease that is emerging as a modern day epidemic.

An omega-3 rich diet really can fight bowel cancer

Eating salmon, walnuts and chia seeds could boost your chances of surviving bowel cancer, a new study claims.

Full of omega-3 fatty acids, the tasty staples prevent deadly tumours from spreading across the body.

When broken down after eating, these then go onto release molecules that directly attack cancerous cells, scientists say. 

Cocoa and chocolate are not just treats -- they are good for your cognition

A balanced diet is chocolate in both hands -- a phrase commonly used to justify ones chocolate snacking behavior. A phrase now shown to actually harbor some truth, as the cocoa bean is a rich source of flavanols: a class of natural compounds that has neuroprotective effects. cording to Science daily

In their recent review researchers examined the available literature for the effects of acute and chronic administration of cocoa flavanols on different cognitive domains. In other words: what happens to your brain up to a few hours after you eat cocoa flavanols, and what happens when you sustain such a cocoa flavanol enriched diet for a prolonged period of time?

Although randomized controlled trials investigating the acute effect of cocoa flavanols are sparse, most of them point towards a beneficial effect on cognitive performance. Participants showed, among others, enhancements in working memory performance and improved visual information processing after having had cocoa flavanols. And for women, eating cocoa after a night of total sleep deprivation actually counteracted the cognitive impairment (i.e. less accuracy in performing tasks) that such a night brings about. Promising results for people that suffer from chronic sleep deprivation or work shifts.