Nutrition linked to brain health and intelligence in older adults

A study of older adults links consumption of a pigment found in leafy greens to the preservation of "crystallized intelligence," the ability to use the skills and knowledge one has acquired over a lifetime according to Science daily.

Lutein (LOO-teen) is one of several plant pigments that humans acquire through the diet, primarily by eating leafy green vegetables, cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, or egg yolks, said graduate student Marta Zamroziewicz, who led the study with psychology professor Aron Barbey. Lutein accumulates in the brain, embedding in cell membranes, where it likely plays "a neuroprotective role," she said.

Fat is GOOD for you!

For decades we were told that eating fat would clog our arteries and send us to an early grave, but a current study disproves this theory according to Daily mail. 

In fact, fat may be good for us. A mounting slew of evidence suggests that having full dairy in your diet may actually protect you from heart disease, cancer and Type 2 diabetes.

The study, found overweight middle-age men who ate high levels of saturated fats - mainly found in dairy, meat and tropical oils - and low levels of carbohydrates lost weight

A handful of nuts a day cuts the risk of a wide range of diseases

A large analysis of current research shows that people who eat at least 20g of nuts a day have a lower risk of heart disease, cancer and other diseases according to Science daily.

The analysis of all current studies on nut consumption and disease risk has revealed that 20g a day -- equivalent to a handful -- can cut people's risk of coronary heart disease by nearly 30 percent, their risk of cancer by 15 percent, and their risk of premature death by 22 percent.

Sleep mode: Your brain dozes off even while you’re awake, study finds

One moment you’re alert and paying attention, the next you’ve somehow zoned out and missed something key. New research says this might be a result of parts of the brain switching off even while you’re awake.

Researchers from Stanford University have discovered that, even during waking hours, parts of our brains fall asleep and wake back up all the time, according to RT.

New insights into skin cells could explain why our skin doesn't leak

The discovery of the shape and binding capability of epidermal cells could explain how skin maintains a barrier even when it is shedding according to Science daily.

The authors of the study say their new understanding of how epidermal cells form a barrier may explain the paradox of how we can shed them without compromising our skin's integrity. It could also help us to understand what happens when it forms incorrectly, which could lead to conditions like psoriasis and eczema.