Eating dinner early, or skipping it, may be effective in fighting body fat

The first human test of early time-restricted feeding found that this meal-timing strategy reduced swings in hunger and altered fat and carbohydrate burning patterns, which may help with losing weight. In early time-restricted feeding (eTRF), people eat their last meal by the mid-afternoon and don't eat again until breakfast the next morning.

"Eating only during a much smaller window of time than people are typically used to may help with weight loss," said Courtney Peterson, PhD, who led the study. "We found that eating between 8 am and 2 pm followed by an 18-hour daily fast kept appetite levels more even throughout the day, in comparison to eating between 8 am and 8 pm.

Mothers' nutrition pivotal for healthy child growth

Improving mothers' nutrition before and during pregnancy is pivotal to reducing child stunting in developing countries, researchers said on Tuesday, as a new study showed poor child growth often starts in the womb.

Defined as low height-for-age, stunting affects one in three children in the developing world and carries severe, irreversible consequences for both physical health and cognitive function.

An analysis of data from 137 developing nations by a team of Harvard scientists found the leading cause of stunting is fetal growth restriction (FGR) - poor fetal growth in the womb resulting in a baby being abnormally small at birth.

Dentists issue 'Halloween horror' warning

Armfuls of confectionery are a delicious, sugary reward for dressing up as devils and witches to scare the wits out of the neighbours.

But trick-or-treating will become a "Halloween horror" for children unless parents take steps to protect their teeth, warn dentists, according to BBC.

The Royal College of Surgeons has issued tips to ensure rotten smiles are just for Halloween.

Air pollution linked to blood vessel damage in healthy young adults

Fine particulate matter air pollution may be associated with blood vessel damage and inflammation among young, healthy adults, according to new research.

"These results substantially expand our understanding about how air pollution contributes to cardiovascular disease by showing that exposure is associated with a cascade of adverse effects," said C. Arden Pope, Ph.D., study lead author and Mary Lou Fulton Professor of Economics.

"These findings suggest that living in a polluted environment could promote the development of high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke more pervasively and at an earlier stage than previously thought," said Aruni Bhatnagar, Ph.D., study co-author and the Smith and Lucille Gibson Chair in Medicine. "Although we have known for some time that air pollution can trigger heart attacks or strokes in susceptible, high-risk individuals, the finding that it could also affect even seemingly healthy individuals suggests that increased levels of air pollution are of concern to all of us, not just the sick or the elderly."

Toss eggs onto salads to increase Vitamin E absorption

Adding whole eggs to a colorful salad boosts the amount of Vitamin E the body absorbs from the vegetables, according to research.

"Vitamin E is the second-most under-consumed nutrient in the average diet, which is problematic because this fat-soluble nutrient has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties," said Wayne Campbell, a professor of nutrition science. "Now consumers can easily improve their diets by adding eggs to a salad that boasts a variety of colorful vegetables."

Jung Eun Kim, a postdoctoral researcher, said, "We found Vitamin E absorption was 4- to 7-fold higher when three whole eggs were added to a salad. This study is novel because we measured the absorption of Vitamin E from real foods, rather than supplements, which contain mega-dose amounts of Vitamin E."