Lentils significantly reduce blood glucose levels

Replacing potatoes or rice with pulses can lower your blood glucose levels by more than 20 per cent, according to  Science Daily.

Prof. Alison Duncan, found that swapping out half of a portion of these starchy side dishes for lentils can significantly improve your body's response to the carbohydrates.

Replacing half a serving of rice with lentils caused blood glucose to drop by up to 20 per cent. Replacing potatoes with lentils led to a 35-per-cent drop.

"Pulses are extremely nutrient-dense food that have the potential to reduce chronic diseases associated with mismanaged glucose levels," said Duncan, who worked on the study with PhD student Dita Moravek and M.Sc. students Erica Rogers, Sarah Turkstra and Jessica Wilson.

"We are hoping this research will make people more aware of the health benefits of eating pulses" said Duncan.

Bottle feeding is a woman's right, midwives told

If a woman decides not to breastfeed her baby it is her choice and must be respected, midwives are being told.

The Royal College of Midwives' new position statement makes it explicitly clear that women should be supported if, after being given advice, information and support, they opt to bottle feed using formula milk, according to BBC.

Although breast is best, often some women struggle to start or sustain breastfeeding, says the RCM.

Informed choice must be promoted.

New hope from the 'seven year switch' in Type 1 diabetes

New research has shown that the rapid decline in insulin production that causes type 1 diabetes continues to fall over seven years and then stabilizes, according to Science Daily.

A team at the University of Exeter Medical School found evidence that the amount of insulin produced declines by almost 50% each year for seven years. At that point, the insulin levels stabilise.

The finding is a major step forward in understanding Type 1 diabetes and contradicts previous beliefs that the insulin produced by people with the condition drops relentlessly with time.

How emotions in facial expressions are understood

New research reveals how well fearful facial expressions are perceived in peripheral vision.

Although human vision has the highest resolution when we look directly at something, we see a much wider view of the visual world in our lower resolution peripheral vision. In fact, detecting signals of potential danger in our periphery -- especially moving ones -- is something our visual system is well adapted for, according to Science Daily.

Breast cancer: Test means fewer women will need chemotherapy

About 70% of women with the most common form of early stage breast cancer can be spared the "agony of chemotherapy", researchers say.

It follows trials of a genetic test that analyses the danger of a tumour, according to BBC.

Cancer doctors said the findings would change practice in UK clinics on Monday, and meant women in this group could be treated safely with just surgery and hormone therapy.

Charities said the news, affecting 3,000 UK women a year, was "wonderful".