Study prompts new ideas on cancers’ origins

Rapidly dividing, yet aberrant stem cells are a major source of cancer. But a new study suggests that mature cells also play a key role in initiating cancer -- a finding that could upend the way scientists think about the origins of the disease.

Researchers have found that mature cells have the ability to revert back to behaving more like rapidly dividing stem cells. However, when old cells return to a stem cell-like status, they can carry with them all of the mutations that have accumulated to date, predisposing some of those cells to developing into precancerous lesions, according to Science Daily.

Your mood depends on the food you eat, and what you should eat changes as you get older

Diet and dietary practices differentially affect mental health in young adults versus older adults, according to new research.

Lina Begdache, assistant professor of health and wellness studies, conducted an anonymous internet survey, asking people around the world to complete the Food-Mood Questionnaire (FMQ), which includes questions on food groups that have been associated with neurochemistry and neurobiology. Analyzing the data, Begdache and Assistant Professor found that mood in young adults (18-29) seems to be dependent on food that increases availability of neurotransmitter precursors and concentrations in the brain (meat). However, mood in mature adults (over 30 years) may be more reliant on food that increases availability of antioxidants (fruits) and abstinence of food that inappropriately activates the sympathetic nervous system (coffee, high glycemic index and skipping breakfast), according to Science Daily.

Symptoms of autoimmune diseases worse depending on time of day

A new study has revealed that the symptoms of autoimmune diseases get worse depending on the time of day and how your body clock is working.

Hundreds of millions of people around the world suffer from a range of autoimmune diseases including arthritis, lupus and celiac disease, according to RT.

Soy, cruciferous vegetables associated with fewer common breast cancer treatment side effects

Consuming soy foods (such as soy milk, tofu and edamame) and cruciferous vegetables (such as cabbages, kale, collard greens, bok choy, Brussels sprouts, and broccoli) may be associated with a reduction in common side effects of breast cancer treatment in breast cancer survivors, say a team of scientists.

Researchers say breast cancer survivors often experience side effects from cancer treatments that can persist months or years after completion of treatment. For example, because many treatments designed to prevent breast cancer recurrence inhibit the body's production or use of estrogen, the hormone that can fuel breast cancer growth, breast cancer patients often experience hot flashes and night sweats, among other side effects, according to Science Daily.

Flies more germ-laden than suspected

Scientists have discovered that flies carry more diseases than suspected.

The house fly and the blowfly together harbour more than 600 different bacteria, according to a DNA analysis, according to BBC.

Many are linked with human infections, including stomach bugs, blood poisoning and pneumonia.

Flies can spread bacteria from place-to-place on their legs, feet and wings, experiments show.