Daydreaming is good: It means you're smart

A new study suggests that daydreaming isn't necessarily a bad thing. It might be a sign that you're really smart and creative.

"People with efficient brains may have too much brain capacity to stop their minds from wandering," said Eric Schumacher, professor who co-authored the study.

Schumacher and his students and colleagues, including lead co-author Christine Godwin, measured the brain patterns of more than 100 people while they lay in an MRI machine. Participants were instructed to focus on a stationary fixation point for five minutes. The team used the data to identify which parts of the brain worked in unison according to Science daily.

Walking below minimum recommended levels linked to lower mortality risk

A new study concludes that walking has the potential to significantly improve the public's health. It finds regular walking, even if not meeting the minimum recommended levels, is associated with lower mortality compared to inactivity.

Public health guidelines recommend adults engage in at least 150 minutes of moderate or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity per week. But surveys show only half of adults meet this recommendation. Older adults are even less likely to meet minimum recommendations (42% ages 65-74 years and 28% ages 75 years and older).

Walking is the most common type of physical activity, and has been associated with lower risk of heart disease, diabetes, and breast and colon cancers. While several studies have linked overall moderate-vigorous physical activity to a reduced risk of death, according to Science daily.

Drug therapy 'restores breathing' after spinal injury

A drug-based therapy appears to restore breathing in rats paralysed from the neck down by a spinal injury, according to scientists.

They hope their "exciting but early" findings could ultimately help free patients from ventilators, according to BBC.

The pioneering work, in Cell Reports, suggests the brain may not be needed for respiration if a nerve pathway in the spine can be awakened.

Magic mushrooms can 'reset' depressed brain

A hallucinogen found in magic mushrooms can "reset" the brains of people with untreatable depression, raising hopes of a future treatment, scans suggest.

The small study gave 19 patients a single dose of the psychedelic ingredient psilocybin, according to BBC.

Half of patients ceased to be depressed and experienced changes in their brain activity that lasted about five weeks.

However, the team at Imperial College London says people should not self-medicate.

Handful of nuts a day could prevent type 2 diabetes

A handful of nuts a day could prevent type 2 diabetes, new research suggests.

Omega-6 rich foods, such as nuts and sunflower oil, lower a person's risk of developing the condition by up to 35 per cent, a study review found.

Previous research reveals omega-6 gets converted into linoleic acid in the body, which may prevent type 2 diabetes by improving fat metabolism and insulin sensitivity according to Daily mail.

Lead author Dr Jason Wu, said: 'Our findings suggest that a simple change in diet might protect people from developing type 2 diabetes which has reached alarming levels around the world.'