Sugar 'not necessary' for a good cuppa

It might be a ritual for many but scientists say your cup of tea does not actually need a spoonful of sugar.

A study found participants were able to cut it out without their enjoyment being affected - suggesting a long-term change in behaviour was possible, according to BBC.

Scientists said quitting in one go or reducing intake gradually were both effective strategies to reduce consumption.

No sedentary screen time for babies, WHO SAYS?

Babies and toddlers should not be left to passively watch TV or other screens, according to new World Health Organization guidelines.

Sedentary screen time, including computer games, should not happen before a child is two, the WHO says.

The limit for two- to four-year-olds is an hour a day and less is better.

The new WHO advice focuses on passive viewing - youngsters being placed in front of a TV or computer screen or handed a tablet or mobile phone for entertainment - and is aimed at tackling child inactivity, a leading risk factor for global mortality and obesity-related ill health.

Children who refuse to brush their teeth may be putting themselves at risk of heart disease

Children who refuse to brush their teeth may be putting themselves at risk of heart disease in later life, research suggests.

A study that followed 755 children over 27 years found those with tooth decay or gum disease were more likely to have a build-up of plaque in their arteries as adults, known as atherosclerosis, according to Daily Mail.

This limits the amount of oxygen-rich blood that can reach our organs, raising the risk of a heart attack, stroke or even early death.

Human tongues can smell and contain the same odour receptors that are found in our noses

Taste cells in the tongue contain the same smell receptors as those found up our noses, researchers say.

The findings suggest that the main components of food flavour, taste and smell, work together on the tongue, rather than being first combined in the brain, according to Daily Mail.

No sedentary screen time for babies

Babies and toddlers should not be left to passively watch TV or other screens, according to new World Health Organization guidelines.

Sedentary screen time, including computer games, should not happen before a child is two, the WHO says.

The limit for two- to four-year-olds is an hour a day and less is better.

The UK has no plans to update its own advice on screen use, which sets no time limits, although it says children should avoid screens before bedtime, according to BBC.

The UK's Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health insists there is little evidence screen use for children is harmful in itself.