Diabetes linked to back pain

People with diabetes have a 35 percent higher risk of experiencing low back pain and 24 percent higher risk of having neck pain than those without diabetes, a review by University of Sydney researchers has found.

Their findings, based on meta-analyses of studies that assess the links between diabetes and back or neck pain outcomes ,according to Science Daily.

Most adults experience low back pain during their lives and almost half suffer neck pain at some stage. Diabetes is an increasingly prevalent chronic condition; an estimated 382 million people live with type 2 diabetes, the most common form of this metabolic disease.

Consuming garlic and onions may lower colorectal cancer risk

Consumption of allium vegetables -- which include garlic, leeks, and onions -- was linked with a reduced risk of in colorectal cancer in a study of men and women in China.

In the study, 833 patients of colorectal cancer were matched to 833 healthy controls by age, sex and residence area. Demographic and dietary information were collected via face-to-face interviews using a validated food frequency questionnaire, according to Science Daily.

Most hip and knee replacements 'last longer than thought'

Eight out of 10 knee replacements and six out of 10 hip replacements last as long as 25 years, says a large study from the University of Bristol.

This is much longer than believed, the researchers said, and the findings will help patients and surgeons decide when to carry out surgery, according to BBC.

To date, there has been little data on the success of new hips and knees.

'Jaw-dropping' breakthrough reveals a brand new way our brains work

Cells send messages to totally separate parts of our minds using electrical signals (and scientists previously thought this was impossible)

 The human brain is capable of communicating in a way scientists previously thought was impossible.  

Brain cells can create an electrical field that triggers nearby neurons to pass on a message without any physical or chemical connections, according to Daily Mail. 

Slow and mysterious waves produced by the brain, which have long been known to exist but whose function has been a long-standing mystery, are responsible.

Teeth can be used to predict mental health problems, study finds: Kids with thin enamel have a higher risk of developing depression or bipolar

Teeth tell archeologists everything about ancient civilizations - from their diet to their lifestyle to their cause of death.

But new research suggests the bones in our mouths could reveal details about our future, too, according to Daily Mail.

In particular, scientists found teeth could show our risks of mental health disorders such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia.

Dr Erin Dunn, a psychiatrist at Massachusetts General Hospital, examined lost milk teeth from six-year-olds, and found those with thinner enamel were more likely to have attention deficit issues.