Zionist Occupation Authorities Sentence Syrian Freedom Fighter Sidqi al-Maqt to 14 years in Jail

QUNEITRA, (ST)- The Israeli occupation authorities on Tuesday issued a 14 –year sentence against the dean of the Syrian and Arab prisoners in the Israeli jails Sidqi Sleiman al-Maqt for his role in uncovering the Israeli entity's support for the terrorist organizations in Syria.

Ahmad Sheikh Abdul Qader, Governor of Quneitra,  condemned the occupation's unfair decision which came after the trial of al-Maqt had been postponed many times.

The unjust ruling against freedom fighter Sidqi al-Maqt aims to punish him for his national stances and for his role in exposing the support of the Israeli occupation for the terrorist organizations in Syria, said the governor. It comes within the framework of the occupation authorities' persistence in its policy of harassment against the steadfastness of the people of the occupied Syrian Golan who insist on adhering to their lands and to the Syrian Arab identity despite the occupation's oppression and inhuman practices against them, he added.

Syrian Detainee Sidqi al-Maqt Defies Occupation Authorities over Their Support to Terrorists

QUNEITRA – The Syrian detainee Sidqi al-Maqt affirmed his adherence to his legal and national right of exposing the close relation between the Zionist occupation authorities and the armed terrorist groups such as Jabaht al-Nusra.

According to SANA, al-Maqt, a resident and freedom-fighter in the occupied Syrian Golan, is a long-time prisoner in Israeli jails. He was re-detained by the Israeli authorities on February 25th, 2015, after he had already spent 27 years in Israeli prisons and was released in August 2012.

Calls for Releasing all Syrian Prisoners from Occupation's Jails Renewed on Syrian Prisoners Day

QUNEITRA, (ST)- The Committee for Supporting Syrian Prisoners and Detainees in the Israeli jails has condemned the Zionist occupation's continuous policy of detention and arrest against the people of occupied Syrian Golan, stressing that these policies violate international law and the Fourth Geneva Convention relating to the treatment of civilians under occupation.

Marking the Syrian Prisoners Day, which falls on April 21st,  the committee issued a statement condemning the barbaric treatment of Syrian captives in the Israeli jails, urging the International Red Cross Organization and other humanitarian and human rights bodies to assume their legal responsibilities towards this issue. It called on these organizations to pressure the occupation authorities as to stop its arbitrary detention policy against the people of occupied Syrian Golan and to release all prisoners with the dean of the Syrian prisoners Sidqi al-Maqt on the top of the list.

Syrian Captive Iyad al-Jawhari Released from Occupation's Jails following Five Years of Detention

QUNEITRA, (ST)–Following five years of arbitrary detention, the Israeli occupation authorities on Monday freed Syrian captive, Dr. Iyad al-Jawhari, one of the locals of Majdal Shams town in the occupied Syrian Golan.

 "Resistance against the Israeli occupation is legitimate and national. It is a state of awareness about defending the homeland which is currently confronting a global terrorist war led by western and Israeli Mossad's intelligence rooms aiming to undermine resistant thinking," al-Jawhari told SANA.

He said "resistance of the people of occupied Syrian Golan carries on the heroic deeds and sacrifices of the Syrian Arab army, which has been fighting  terrorist organizations for years, and reiterates that the occupied Golan is an integral part of Syria."

The 35th Anniversary of The National Open Strike

 On  the 35th anniversary of the national Open Strike by the Syrian Arab Citizens under the yoke of the Israeli occupation in the Israeli-occupied Syrian Golan on February 14th, 1982, our hero Syrians reiterated that the option of the Resistance against the occupation is the way for the liberation of the occupied Golan.

The steadfast Syrians in the Golan reiterated, three years back, definite and absolute rejection to the Israeli occupation and to its null, void, and illegitimate practices in the Golan Heights.

Our Syrian compatriots underlined the loyalty of the Golan to the Syrian People, Army, and Leadership in rejection to the present conspiracy and ongoing aggression against Syria, asserting the need to pursue national dialogue and fight against armed terrorist groups in Syria.

''encountering the Israeli enemy, we extend our hands to shake the hands of every honest Syrian and embrace him/her and appeal to them to stand against the criminal gangs and their sectarian schemes and rally behind the leadership of President Bashar Al-Assad,'' read the statement issued by our family members under the yoke of occupation.

Our compatriots underscored that Syria is the dearest and above all  and that the 14th of February would ever remain the symbol for rejection Israeli ID's and that the Golan is but Syrian and ever to remain Syrian Arab land and people.

According to International Committee of the Red Cross, Israel's occupation of the Golan severely restricts the ability of its Arab residents to go about their daily lives. In addition, many have relatives across the demarcation line in Syria that they have not seen for years.

Haniya Saleem Bader Eldeen Shams has lived in the occupied Golan since 1968 when she came to be married. Her son, Youseef Hussein Shams, explains that his mother's family live on the other side of the demarcation line.

"She used to be as healthy as a horse," he says, "but since 2003 she has suffered a heart attack and has been hospitalized three times. She is always in tears, sad and depressed."

 During a one week trip to Jordan in 2003 was the last time Haniya saw her family. On the last day of the visit, her older brother died of a heart attack but because his body was taken home  to Syria, Haniya was unable to attend the funeral. Her son says this experience broke her health.  Earlier, she had been able to spend one month with her family in Syria in 1990 as part of the ICRC's family visit programme but this was suspended by the Israeli authorities in 1992. Yousef spends around 50 dollars a week on a twenty-minute phone call that allows his mother to talk to her family. "It's expensive," he says "but after she fell sick, I do what I can to help her."  "When she came here, she left her family behind. She did not see them or their children as they grew up. She missed that sense of family. If the family visits were restored, it would compensate for some of those moments and heal some of the injuries."

  "It was a difficult decision to make when I decided to come here," says Najwa Fawaz Abu Shaqra – Amasha. "My family and my father were very sad. They tried to convince me not to come. I had to ignore them to find the strength to stick to my decision and not be overwhelmed by sadness."

 The 37 year old woman left her home in Damascus in 2004 to live with her new husband in the occupied Golan. They had met at University in Damascus where they were both studying. "At first the question of his return to the occupied Golan, was not an issue," she explains, "We saw each other for three years during our studies and we fell in love. My choice then was to leave him or leave my family. It took a year to get the authorization to come here," she adds." When the approval came, I had to seize the opportunity. If I had hesitated it would have been too late."  In addition to the problems of adjusting to a new community, she is not entitled to an Israeli identification card for the first three years of her residence. This means she cannot travel outside Israel and the occupied Golan, cannot study and cannot work. 

Her new husband found work as an English teacher in Beer Sheba, in central Israel and is only home on weekends. She has no family of her own in the occupied Golan, and without family visits across the demarcation line, she does not know when she will see them again. She says the most difficult moment was when she gave birth two years ago. "I wanted my mother," she says, "I was very sad, it was very difficult not to have her there."

"My father was using a megaphone to talk to us from the shouting hill and he became very emotional. He collapsed from a heart attack and died on the spot," explains Aida Kasim Amasha. "I applied immediately for a permit to go to his funeral, but it was refused. I wanted to touch my father one last time."

 The shouting hill is on the Syrian side of the ceasefire line in the Golan and overlooks the village of Majdal Shams on the Israeli occupied side. The families separated since the 1967 ceasefire use megaphones to communicate across the barbed wire that divides them. The old woman came from Damascus in 1980 to marry her husband in the occupied Golan. Although she studied mathematics, physics and chemistry in Syria before leaving she does not have a permit to work in Israel.  Last year her 83 year old mother died. "She had been sick for a long time and had undergone surgery. But I could not go to see her before she passed away." She says she is now so depressed that she stays indoors most of the time.  She has four brothers and two sisters in Syria but it is not possible to visit them. "Family weddings over there are very sad events for us," she adds," we cannot participate."  The difficulties of her life in the occupied Golan are not new to her. She lost her five year old daughter fifteen years ago. "All my family could do is offer condolences from the shouting hill."

 ''Family is a physical experience," says 93 year old Sheikh Hasan Yousef Basheer. "We need to touch one another, to feel the children climbing onto you." Although his daughters live with him in the village of Majdal Shams, the rest of his family are all on the Syrian side of the 1967 ceasefire line. "Extended family is so important," he says.

 He was able to take part in a family visit organized in 1979 and again in 1990 but the programme was suspended by the Israeli authorities in 1992. "It was like a big wedding," he says, "It was the first time I had seen all my family members since the 1967 war. Everyone was singing, everyone wanted to kiss me and I kissed them all. I was able to stay one month, it was a good time."  Since that last visit his two brothers have passed away, but he still has one brother, a sister, as well as nephews and nieces. He says he hopes to see them again, "as long as God is willing."

As an elder, he was able to cross into Syria last September as part of an annual religious pilgrimage facilitated by the ICRC. But he says the pilgrimage is too short, leaving them little more than one evening to visit family.  "When we haven't seen each other in so long, it is difficult to talk. At first there is nothing to say. We need the time to really sit together, to talk and re-establish contact, to reminisce about the old days." "The pilgrimage is too short to do that," he adds, "it just reopens the wound. When I come back I am depressed and sad." He has been married to his second wife since 1994, "but she has never met any of my family on the other side."  "It is not right," he concludes, "people are dying without the chance to see their relatives. We are all human beings; shouldn't we have the right to visit?"

 "In a dream I saw my mother's funeral," says Mohasna Sulieman Taweel Merij. "The next morning I learned she had passed way during the night. Her mother had been sick for some time, and she tried to find a way to visit her, but it was impossible. "On the phone my mother kept crying and begging for me to come, but I could not."

 Mohasna Sulieman Taweel Merij points to her family's village in Syria just the other side of the mountain. "She had sent a message the day before her death telling me to call, but our phone was not working. She stayed alive until one in the morning wondering why I didn’t call," says Mohasna. On hearing of her mother's death she tried to sneak across the demarcation line and walk the four kilometres to her family village. Her sons physically restrained her because of the danger of minefields. Mohasna moved from the village of Hadar in Syria proper to the occupied Golan to marry in 1973 at the age of 16. She has been back once in 1990 as part of the family visit programme. Her husband died of a heart attack just after that visit. She can still telephone her family in Syria, but because she is a widow, she says she can only afford a short call every two months. "We spend all the time crying on the phone and I listen to them begging me to come visit." Her worry now is whether she will be able to see one of her brothers who has been sick for the last three years. "We are roughly the same age and we were very close growing up," she explains, "I want to see him again, but I am afraid he will die first. I haven't been with him in 16 years. To see him again would be the most precious moment in my life." Mohasna has three sons and three daughters. One of her daughters lives in Austria and has come home to visit. Mohasna travelled to Austria for three weeks when her daughter gave birth. "It's easier to go to Austria than to my family's village behind that mountain over there," she points in the direction of Syria. "It would take me thirty minutes to walk there."

 

The Syrians in the occupied Golan Heights issued on December19,1981, their National Document in rejection of the Israeli illegal, and void decision to annex Golan.

 Our people in the occupied Golan Heights issued a  document stressing  their strong adherence  to their  Syrian identity. This document was  addressed to the United Nations and its institutions , the world public opinion and to  all the official and popular  establishments all over  the world.

 Undoubtedly, this document  expresses  the  real  stance of the Syrians in the occupied Golan and their rejection of  the Israeli occupation.  The Syrians in the occupied Golan have a  responsibility towards  the future generations and they are determined to resist the occupation till realizing liberation. The  document contains the following:

1– The occupied Golan Heights is an integral part of  the Syrian  Arab Republic .

2 – The Syrian Arab nationality  is  a real  and lasting characteristic which is  inherited to  us from  our parents. It is our responsibility  to give this inheritance  to our children .

 3 - Our territories  are  a sacred ownership to all our sons  of the  Syrian society. And every  Syrian citizen  tries to sell or give  up any inch of  our lands to the Israeli  occupier, is treated as  committing  a great crime and unforgivable national treason  against our society,.

4 – We do  not recognize  any decision issued  by  the Israeli occupier  to annex us to  the Zionist entity. Besides we  completely reject the Israeli government's decisions aiming at stealing   our Syrian Arab identity .

5 - We do not recognize  the legitimacy of the local  and sectarian  councils. For these  councils are appointed by the Israeli military government and they receive their  instructions from it.  And the members of these councils do not in any way  represent us.

6 – No one deserves to express Syrians' ambitions  except  those people  from all our social sectors , who reject the occupation through their  true national stances .

7 - Every citizen in the occupied Syrian Golan Heights who accepts  to replace his Syrian nationality with the  Israeli  one is considered a traitor.

8 - we decided an irreversible decision which  is :  we will dismiss all people who accept to be an Israeli citizen. And  every one  violating  the content of this document will be expelled from our religion and Syrian society . Besides, he will be deprived  of  dealing with the other people, and no one would  share him  his  joys and  sadness until he  confesses his guilt. Then he must ask  permission from the society , so as to restore his real nationality .

9 - We have adopted this document depending on our authentic  spiritual,  national and humanitarian  heritage which  encourages us to offer our  deep sincerity  to  our homeland, Syria.

 

Dr. Mohammad Abdo Al-Ibrahim/ Maysa Wassouf