Crows have a soft side too: Corvids touch and preen each other to make up after getting in a fight

Crows have long been thought of as symbols of death.

But despite their sinister reputation, it appears these clever corvids also have a softer side according to Daily mail.

Researchers have found that after getting into a fight, crows attempt to 'kiss and make up' by touching and preening each other - even if it's with a relative stranger.

Crows have been studied for their intelligence and belong to a family of birds called corvids, which also include smart winged species like magpies and nutcrackers.

'World's ugliest pig' caught on camera

Scientists have captured the first footage in the wild of one of the world's rarest - and ugliest - pigs.

The Javan warty pig is under such threat from hunting and habitat loss that conservationists surveying its habitat believed it might already have been driven to extinction, according to BBC.

Camera traps have now revealed that small populations survive in Java's increasingly fragmented forests.

Plants reveal decision-making abilities under competition

Biologists have demonstrated that plants can choose between alternative competitive responses according to the stature and densities of their opponents. A new study by researchers reveals that plants can evaluate the competitive ability of their neighbors and optimally match their responses to them.

Animals facing competition have been shown to optimally choose between different behaviors, including confrontation, avoidance and tolerance, depending on the competitive ability of their opponents relative to their own. For example, if their competitors are bigger or stronger, animals are expected to "give up the fight" and choose avoidance or tolerance over confrontation, according to Science Daily.

Bees use invisible heat patterns to choose flowers

A new study, has found that a wide range of flowers produce not just signals that we can see and smell, but also ones that are invisible such as heat, according to Science Daily.

In the hidden world of flower-pollinator interactions, heat can act not only as life-sustaining warmth, but can also be part of the rich variety of sensory signposts that flowers use to provide advertisement and information for their insect pollinators.

The majority of flowers examined, including many common in gardens, such as poppies and daisies, had complex patterns of heat across their petals, echoing the colourful patterns that we see with our own eyes.

On average these patterns were 4-5°C warmer than the rest of the flower, although the patterns could be as much as 11°C warmer.

Smoke rings' in the ocean could 'suck-up' small creatures and send them 'flying'

Researchers have spotted the equivalent of smoke-rings in the ocean which they think could 'suck-up' small marine creatures and carry them at high speed and for long distances across the ocean, according to Science Daily.

The ocean is full of eddies, swirling motions some tens to hundreds of kilometres across, which mix the water and carry it across the average currents. The 'smoke-rings' are a pair of linked eddies spinning in opposite directions that travel up to ten times the speed of 'normal' eddies and were spotted in the Sea. The rings in the ocean are cut in half by the sea surface, so we see the two ends of the half ring at the surface.