How seals sleep with only half their brain at a time

A new study led by an international team of biologists has identified some of the brain chemicals that allow seals to sleep with half of their brain at a time according to Science daily.

The study was headed by scientists. It identified the chemical cues that allow the seal brain to remain half awake and asleep. Findings from this study may explain the biological mechanisms that enable the brain to remain alert during waking hours and go off-line during sleep.

"Seals do something biologically amazing -- they sleep with half their brain at a time. The left side of their brain can sleep while the right side stays awake.

'Diet is global food policy's elephant in the room'

Global food policy needs to shift way from focusing on feeding people calories to nourishing people with healthy diets, say leading experts.

They state that poor diets were responsible for more of the global health burden than sex, drugs, alcohol and tobacco combined.

While almost 800 million people are hungry, they say two billion people are either overweight or obese, according to BBC.

Predation on pollinating insects shaped the evolution of the orchid mantis

A team of scientists discovered that the orchid mantis looks like a flower due to the exploitation of pollinating insects as prey by its praying mantis ancestors according to Science daily.

By studying the evolutionary relationships of the orchid mantis and its distant relatives, the team discovered that females in the orchid mantis lineage increased in size and changed color over their evolutionary history to gain advantage over large pollinating insects, such as bees, as well as the ability to attract them for predation. However, the morphologically dissimilar males are small and camouflaged, enabling them to live a life of predator avoidance and mate finding. The team found that this difference in males and females, termed sexual dimorphism, was likely the result of female predatory success that favored larger and more conspicuously colored individuals.

Light switch in autumn leaves

Before trees lose their leaves in the winter, they offer us a bright autumnal display of reds, oranges, and yellows. This result from the decomposition of the compound that makes leaves green: chlorophyll. Among the decomposition products are yellow phyllobilins that demonstrate unusual chemical properties, these compounds act as four-step molecular "switches" that are triggered by light in different ways depending on the environment according to Science daily.

Ancient seagrass holds secrets of the oldest living organism on Earth

It's big, it's old and it lives under the sea -- and now research has confirmed that an ancient seagrass holds the secrets of the oldest living organism on Earth according to Science daily.

Ancient giant Posidonia oceanica reproduces asexually, generating clones of itself. A single organism -- which has been found to span up to 15 kilometres in width and reach more than 6,000 metric tonnes in mass -- may well be more than 100,000 years old.

"Clonal organisms have an extraordinary capacity to transmit only 'highly competent' genomes, through generations, with potentially no end," said Professor Carlos Duarte.